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Great Lakes Indian Accommodation And Resistance During The Early Reservation Years 1850 1900

Great Lakes Indian Accommodation and Resistance During the Early Reservation Years  1850 1900 PDF

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Author: Edmund Jefferson Danziger
Publisher: University of Michigan Press
ISBN: 0472096907
Size: 15.11 MB
Format: PDF
Category : History
Languages : en
Pages : 322
View: 6397


The story of how Great Lakes Indians survived the early reservation years

Survival And Regeneration

Survival and Regeneration PDF

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Author: Edmund Jefferson Danziger
Publisher: Wayne State University Press
ISBN: 9780814323489
Size: 25.77 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
Category : History
Languages : en
Pages : 260
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Survival and Regeneration captures the heritage of Detroit's colorful Indian community through printed sources and the personal life stories of many Native Americans. During a ten-year period, Edmund Danziger interviewed hundreds of Indians about their past and their needs and aspirations for the future. This history is essentially their success story. In search of new opportunities, a growing number of rural Indians journeyed to Detroit after World War II. Destitute reservations had sapped their physical and cultural strength; paternalistic bureaucrats undermined their self-respect and confidence; and despairing tribal members too often found solace in mind-numbing alcohol. Cut off from the Bureau of Indian Affairs services, many newcomers had difficulty establishing themselves successfully in the city and experienced feelings of insecurity and powerlessness. By 1970, they were one of the Motor City's most "invisible" minority groups, so mobile and dispersed throughout the metropolitan area that not even the Indian organizations knew where they all lived. To grasp the nature of their remarkable regeneration, this inspiring volume examines the historic challenges that Native American migrants to Detroit faced—adjusting to urban life, finding a good job and a decent place to live, securing quality medical care, educating their children, and maintaining their unique cultural heritage. Danziger scrutinizes the leadership that emerged within the Indian community and the importance of personal networks and formal native organizations through which the Indian community's wide-ranging needs have been met. He also highlights the significant progress enjoyed by Detroit Indians—improved housing, higher educational achievement, less unemployment, and greater average family incomes—that has resulted from their persistence and self-determination. Historically, the Motor City has provided an environment where lives could be refashioned amid abundant opportunities. Indians have not been totally assimilated, nor have they forsaken Detroit en masse for their former homelands. Instead, they have forged vibrant lives for themselves as Indian-Detroiters. They are not as numerous or politically powerful as their black neighbors, but the story of these native peoples leaves no doubt about their importance to Detroit and of the city's effect on them.

For Home And Empire

For Home and Empire PDF

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Author: Steve Marti
Publisher: UBC Press
ISBN: 0774861231
Size: 11.88 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
Category : History
Languages : en
Pages :
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For Home and Empire is the first book to compare voluntary wartime mobilization on the Australian, Canadian, and New Zealand home fronts. Steve Marti shows that collective acts of patriotism strengthened communal bonds, while reinforcing class, race, and gender boundaries. Which jurisdiction should provide for a soldier’s wife if she moved from Hobart to northern Tasmania? Should Welsh women in Vancouver purchase comforts for hometown soldiers or Welsh ones? Should Māori enlist with a local or an Indigenous battalion? Such questions highlighted the diverging interests of local communities, the dominion governments, and the Empire. Marti applies a settler colonial framework to reveal the geographical and social divides that separated communities as they organized for war.

Cheboygan Twin Lakes Community In The Woods

Cheboygan Twin Lakes  Community in the Woods PDF

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Author: Thomas R. Knox
Publisher: Xlibris Corporation
ISBN: 1796010634
Size: 50.22 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
Category : History
Languages : en
Pages : 230
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This book explores the complex physical, historical, and social factors that have allowed a small kettle lake in northeastern Michigan to remain ecologically and environmentally sound, a gem lake. The book investigates these within the context of local/regional, state, and national history. It also tells a story of how and why a community of residents has been formed in the forest and has functioned as an effective steward of its natural resources.

Blackbird S Song

Blackbird s Song PDF

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Author: Theodore J. Karamanski
Publisher: MSU Press
ISBN: 1609173376
Size: 19.74 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
Category : Biography & Autobiography
Languages : en
Pages : 322
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For much of U.S. history, the story of native people has been written by historians and anthropologists relying on the often biased accounts of European-American observers. Though we have become well acquainted with war chiefs like Pontiac and Crazy Horse, it has been at the expense of better knowing civic-minded intellectuals like Andrew J. Blackbird, who sought in 1887 to give a voice to his people through his landmark book History of the Ottawa and Chippewa People. Blackbird chronicled the numerous ways in which these Great Lakes people fought to retain their land and culture, first with military resistance and later by claiming the tools of citizenship. This stirring account reflects on the lived experience of the Odawa people and the work of one of their greatest advocates.

The Oxford Handbook Of American Indian History

The Oxford Handbook of American Indian History PDF

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Author: Frederick E. Hoxie
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 019985890X
Size: 17.18 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
Category : History
Languages : en
Pages : 240
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"Everything you know about Indians is wrong." As the provocative title of Paul Chaat Smith's 2009 book proclaims, everyone knows about Native Americans, but most of what they know is the fruit of stereotypes and vague images. The real people, real communities, and real events of indigenous America continue to elude most people. The Oxford Handbook of American Indian History confronts this erroneous view by presenting an accurate and comprehensive history of the indigenous peoples who lived-and live-in the territory that became the United States. Thirty-two leading experts, both Native and non-Native, describe the historical developments of the past 500 years in American Indian history, focusing on significant moments of upheaval and change, histories of indigenous occupation, and overviews of Indian community life. The first section of the book charts Indian history from before 1492 to European invasions and settlement, analyzing US expansion and its consequences for Indian survival up to the twenty-first century. A second group of essays consists of regional and tribal histories. The final section illuminates distinctive themes of Indian life, including gender, sexuality and family, spirituality, art, intellectual history, education, public welfare, legal issues, and urban experiences. A much-needed and eye-opening account of American Indians, this Handbook unveils the real history often hidden behind wrong assumptions, offering stimulating ideas and resources for new generations to pursue research on this topic.

Empire Education And Indigenous Childhoods

Empire  Education  and Indigenous Childhoods PDF

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Author: Helen May
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317144341
Size: 21.55 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
Category : History
Languages : en
Pages : 300
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Taking up a little-known story of education, schooling, and missionary endeavor, Helen May, Baljit Kaur, and Larry Prochner focus on the experiences of very young ’native’ children in three British colonies. In missionary settlements across the northern part of the North Island of New Zealand, Upper Canada, and British-controlled India, experimental British ventures for placing young children of the poor in infant schools were simultaneously transported to and adopted for all three colonies. From the 1820s to the 1850s, this transplantation of Britain’s infant schools to its distant colonies was deemed a radical and enlightened tool that was meant to hasten the conversion of 'heathen' peoples by missionaries to Christianity and to European modes of civilization. The intertwined legacies of European exploration, enlightenment ideals, education, and empire building, the authors argue, provided a springboard for British colonial and missionary activity across the globe during the nineteenth century. Informed by archival research and focused on the shared as well as unique aspects of the infant schools’ colonial experience, Empire, Education, and Indigenous Childhoods illuminates both the pervasiveness of missionary education and the diverse contexts in which its attendant ideals were applied.

The Great American Mosaic An Exploration Of Diversity In Primary Documents 4 Volumes

The Great American Mosaic  An Exploration of Diversity in Primary Documents  4 volumes  PDF

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Author: Gary Y. Okihiro
Publisher: ABC-CLIO
ISBN: 1610696131
Size: 65.90 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
Category : Education
Languages : en
Pages : 1858
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Firsthand sources are brought together to illuminate the diversity of American history in a unique way—by sharing the perspectives of people of color who participated in landmark events. • Highlights the history and experience of people of color in the United States through 450 important documents and firsthand accounts • Introduces readers to multiple viewpoints about landmark events • Provides a unique and helpful "Guide to Why and How to Use Primary Documents"

Our Voices Must Be Heard

Our Voices Must Be Heard PDF

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Author: Tarah Brookfield
Publisher: UBC Press
ISBN: 0774860227
Size: 66.39 MB
Format: PDF
Category : History
Languages : en
Pages : 256
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In 1844, seven widows dared to cast ballots in an election in Canada West, a display of feminist effrontery that was quickly punished: the government struck a law excluding women from the vote. It would be seven decades before women regained voting rights in Ontario. Our Voices Must Be Heard explores Ontario’s suffrage history, examining its ideals and failings, its daring supporters and thunderous enemies, and its blind spots on matters of race and class. It looks at how and why suffragists from around the province joined an international movement they called “the great cause.” This is the second volume in the seven-part Women’s Suffrage and the Struggle for Democracy series.

Witness To Loss

Witness to Loss PDF

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Author: Jordan Stanger-Ross
Publisher: McGill-Queen's Press - MQUP
ISBN: 0773551964
Size: 55.65 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
Category : History
Languages : en
Pages :
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When the federal government uprooted and interned Japanese Canadians en masse in 1942, Kishizo Kimura saw his life upended along with tens of thousands of others. But his story is also unique: as a member of two controversial committees that oversaw the forced sale of the property of Japanese Canadians in Vancouver during the Second World War, Kimura participated in the dispossession of his own community. In Witness to Loss Kimura's previously unknown memoir – written in the last years of his life – is translated from Japanese to English and published for the first time. This remarkable document chronicles a history of racism in British Columbia, describes the activities of the committees on which Kimura served, and seeks to defend his actions. Diverse reflections of leading historians, sociologists, and a community activist and educator who lived through this history give context to the memoir, inviting readers to grapple with a rich and contentious past. More complex than just hero or villain, oppressor or victim, Kimura raises important questions about the meaning of resistance and collaboration and the constraints faced by an entire generation. Illuminating the difficult, even impossible, circumstances that confronted the victims of racist state action in the mid-twentieth century, Witness to Loss reminds us that the challenge of understanding is greater than that of judgment.

Our Relations The Mixed Bloods

 Our Relations   the Mixed Bloods  PDF

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Author: Larry Nesper
Publisher: SUNY Press
ISBN: 1438482876
Size: 73.67 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
Category : Social Science
Languages : en
Pages : 264
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Articulates the relationships between kinship, racial ideology, mixed blood treaty provisions, and landscape transformation in the Great Lakes region. In the Great Lakes region of the nineteenth century, “mixed bloods” were a class of people living within changing indigenous communities. As such, they were considered in treaties signed between the tribal nations and the federal government. Larry Nesper focuses on the implementation and long-term effects of the mixed-blood provision of the 1854 treaty with the Chippewa of Wisconsin. That treaty not only ceded lands and created the Ojibwe Indian reservations in the region, it also entitled hundreds of “mixed-bloods belonging to the Chippewas of Lake Superior,” as they appear in this treaty, to locate parcels of land in the ceded territories. However, quickly dispossessed of their entitlement, the treaty provision effectively capitalized the first mining companies in Wisconsin, initiating the period of non-renewable resource extraction that changed the demography, ecology, and potential future for the region for both natives and non-natives. With the influx of Euro-Americans onto these lands, conflicts over belonging and difference, as well as community leadership, proliferated on these new reservations well into the twentieth century. This book reveals the tensions between emergent racial ideology and the resilience of kinship that shaped the historical trajectory of regional tribal society to the present. Larry Nesper is Professor of Anthropology at the University of Wisconsin–Madison. He is the author of The Walleye War: The Struggle for Ojibwe Spearfishing and Treaty Rights and the coeditor (with Brain Hosmer) of Tribal Worlds: Critical Studies in American Indian Nation Building, also published by SUNY Press.

Voices Of The American Indian Experience

Voices of the American Indian Experience PDF

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Author: James E. Seelye
Publisher: ABC-CLIO
ISBN: 031338116X
Size: 61.42 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
Category : History
Languages : en
Pages : 796
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In a single source, this comprehensive two-volume work provides the entire history of American Indians, as told by Indians themselves.

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