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Catholicism Contending With Modernity

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Author: Darrell Jodock
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9780521770712
Size: 70.83 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
Category : Religion
Languages : en
Pages : 345
View: 2826


This 2000 book is a case study in the ongoing struggle of Christianity to define its relationship to modernity, examining representative Roman Catholic Modernists and anti-Modernists. It sketches the nineteenth-century background of the Modernist crisis, identifying the problems that the church was facing at the beginning of the twentieth century.

Contending With Modernity

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Author: Philip Gleason
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 9780195356939
Size: 56.40 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
Category : History
Languages : en
Pages : 448
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How did Catholic colleges and universities deal with the modernization of education and the rise of research universities? In this book, Philip Gleason offers the first comprehensive study of Catholic higher education in the twentieth century, tracing the evolution of responses to an increasingly secular educational system. At the beginning of the century, Catholics accepted modernization in the organizational sphere while resisting it ideologically. Convinced of the truth of their religious and intellectual position, the restructured Catholic colleges grew rapidly after World War I, committed to educating for a "Catholic Renaissance." This spirit of militance carried over into the post-World War II era, but new currents were also stirring as Catholics began to look more favorably on modernity in its American form. Meanwhile, their colleges and universities were being transformed by continuing growth and professionalization. By the 1960's, changes in church teaching and cultural upheaval in American society reinforced the internal transformation already under way, creating an "identity crisis" which left Catholic educators uncertain of their purpose. Emphasizing the importance to American culture of the growth of education at all levels, Gleason connects the Catholic story with major national trends and historical events. By situating developments in higher education within the context of American Catholic thought, Contending with Modernity provides the fullest account available of the intellectual development of American Catholicism in the twentieth century.

The Fathers Refounded

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Author: Elizabeth A. Clark
Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press
ISBN: 0812295625
Size: 74.85 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
Category : Religion
Languages : en
Pages : 448
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In the early twentieth century, a new generation of liberal professors sought to prove Christianity's compatibility with contemporary currents in the study of philosophy, science, history, and democracy. These modernizing professors—Arthur Cushman McGiffert at Union Theological Seminary, George LaPiana at Harvard Divinity School, and Shirley Jackson Case at the University of Chicago Divinity School—hoped to equip their students with a revisionary version of early Christianity that was embedded in its social, historical, and intellectual settings. In The Fathers Refounded, Elizabeth A. Clark provides the first critical analysis of these figures' lives, scholarship, and lasting contributions to the study of Christianity. The Fathers Refounded continues the exploration of Christian intellectual revision begun by Clark in Founding the Fathers: Early Church History and Protestant Professors in Nineteenth-Century America. Drawing on rigorous archival research, Clark takes the reader through the professors' published writings, their institutions, and even their classrooms—where McGiffert tailored nineteenth-century German Protestant theology to his modernist philosophies; where LaPiana, the first Catholic professor at Harvard Divinity School, devised his modernism against the tight constraints of contemporary Catholic theology; and where Case promoted reading Christianity through social-scientific aims and methods. Each, in his own way, extricated his subfield from denominationally and theologically oriented approaches and aligned it with secular historical methodologies. In so doing, this generation of scholars fundamentally altered the directions of Catholic Modernism and Protestant Liberalism and offered the promise of reconciling Christianity and modern intellectual and social culture.

Neither Nature Nor Grace

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Author: T. Adam Van Wart
Publisher: Catholic University of America Press
ISBN: 0813233496
Size: 41.41 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
Category : Religion
Languages : en
Pages : 320
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Neither Nature nor Grace operates at the intersection of systematic and philosophical theology, exploring in particular how St. Thomas Aquinas variously uses the latter in service to the clarification and faithful advancement of the former. More specifically, Neither Nature nor Grace explores the overlooked logical difficulties that have followed the late modern debates in ecumenical Christian theology as to whether knowledge of God is available solely through God's gracious self-revelation (e.g., Jesus Christ and Holy Scripture), or through revelation and the deliverances of natural reason. Van Wart takes the prominent French Dominican Reginald Garrigou-Lagrange as paradigmatic for the case that knowledge of God can be had by both revelation and natural reason. Representing the opposing position, that God can only be known through divine revelation, Van Wart highlights the work of influential Protestant theologian Karl Barth. By placing these two imposing 20th century theologians in conversation, and by providing a careful theo-philosophical analysis of the logical mechanics of each thinker's respective arguments, Van Wart shows how both inadvertently overreach their self-professed epistemological bounds and just so run into significant problems maintaining the coherence of their relative theological positions. That is, against their expressed intentions to the contrary, both thinkers unwittingly evacuate the divine essence of the mystery Christian tradition has always previously claimed it to have, effectively reducing the being of God to mere creaturely being writ large. As a contrasting corrective to this problem, Van Wart proffers a constructive grammatical reading of Aquinas's measured account of the crucial but often overlooked logical differences between what can be said of the divine, on the one hand, versus what can be known of God, on the other. While many recent works have attempted to solve the ongoing arguments which Garrigou-Lagrange and Barth epitomize regarding the epistemic use of God's effects, Van Wart's contribution constructively pushes the conversation to a different level in showing how Aquinas's grammar of God provides a salutary means of dissolving and moving beyond these contentious debates altogether.

Mystic Moderns

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Author: James H Thrall
Publisher:
ISBN: 1498583784
Size: 76.89 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
Category :
Languages : en
Pages : 336
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Mystic Moderns examines the responses of three British authors--Evelyn Underhill (1875-1941), May Sinclair (1863-1946), and Mary Webb (1881-1927)--to the emerging modernity of the long early twentieth-century moment encompassing the First World War. As they explored divergent but overlapping understandings of what mystical experience might be, these authors rejected claims that modernity's celebration of the secular and rational left no place for the mystical; rather, they countered, sensitivity to a greater reality could both establish and validate personal agency, and was integral to their identities as modern women. Their preoccupations with the dynamism of human connection drew on prevailing ideas of "vital energy" or "life force" developed by Arthur Schopenhauer and Henri Bergson in ways that channeled modernity's erotic energy of change. By using their fiction to describe new, self-authenticating forms of mysticism separate from either the prevailing orthodoxy of establishment Christianity or the extreme heterodoxy of their era's enthusiasm for paranormal experimentation, they also contributed to the rise of a generic concept of "spirituality." Mystic Moderns thus offers historical perspective on contemporary claims for self-constructed, non-institutional spiritual experience associated with the claim "I'm spiritual, not religious." Working as they did within the shadow of the First World War, Underhill, Sinclair, and Webb were, in the end, attempting to determine what might be of authentic value for a modern age marked by ubiquitous death. While not themselves utopian authors, each was touched by her era's complicated hunger for the best of all possible worlds. Their constructions of how an individual should be and act in the midst of modernity thus simultaneously projected visions of what that modernity itself should become.

U S Catholic Historian

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Author:
Publisher:
ISBN:
Size: 21.17 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
Category :
Languages : en
Pages :
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Ressourcement Theology

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Author: Patricia Kelly
Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing
ISBN: 0567672514
Size: 38.31 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
Category : Religion
Languages : en
Pages : 224
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Ressourcement Theology: A Sourcebook offers a collection of texts previously unavailable in English from leading Dominicans and Jesuits, who initiated a movement for renewal that contributed to the reforms of the Second Vatican Council. In the last decade, theologians have undertaken a serious reappraisal of the contribution of Ressourcement theology to 20th century theology in the Catholic tradition and beyond. This 'return to Ressourcement' has resulted in many of the principal texts being translated into English and (re-)issued, ensuring their accessibility to scholars across the globe. Despite this, many of the earliest documents relating to the history of Ressourcement theology are unavailable to most English-speaking scholars, as they are largely journal articles and book chapters published in French. Patricia Kelly has selected the most significant texts that so far have been unavailable in English, including the controversial piece by Jean-Marie LeBlond ('The Analogy of Truth') that was condemned in the 1950s by the Vatican, as well as the response to Labourdette's attack on LeBlond, penned anonymously by a group of Jesuits. All of these documents will help students and scholars to engage deeply with the history of the Ressourcement movement and its relevance for the developments of the Catholic tradition.

Heythrop Journal

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Author:
Publisher:
ISBN:
Size: 60.73 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
Category : Philosophy
Languages : en
Pages :
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A select book list appears quarterly.

The Making And Unmaking Of The English Catholic Intellectual Community 1910 1950

The Making and Unmaking of the English Catholic Intellectual Community  1910 1950 PDF

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Author: James R. Lothian
Publisher:
ISBN:
Size: 37.88 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
Category : Religion
Languages : en
Pages : 487
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In The Making and Unmaking of the English Catholic Intellectual Community, 1910-1950, James R. Lothian examines the engagement of interwar Catholic writers and artists both with modernity in general and with the political and economic upheavals of the times in England and continental Europe. The book describes a close-knit community of Catholic intellectuals that coalesced in the aftermath of the Great War and was inspired by Hilaire Belloc's ideology. Among the more than two dozen figures considered in this volume are G. K. Chesterton, novelist Evelyn Waugh, poet and painter David Jones, sculptor Eric Gill, historian Christopher Dawson, and publishers Frank Sheed and Maisie Ward. For Catholic intellectuals who embraced Bellocianism, the response to contemporary politics was a potent combination of hostility toward parliamentary democracy, capitalism, and so-called "Protestant" Whig history. Belloc and his friends asserted a set of political, economic, and historiographical alternatives--favoring monarchy and Distributism, a social and economic system modeled on what Belloc took to be the ideals of medieval feudalism. Lothian explores the community's development in the 1920s and 1930s, and its dissolution in the 1940s, in the aftermath of World War II. Frank Sheed and Maisie Ward, joined by Tom Burns and Christopher Dawson, promoted an aesthetic and philosophical vision very much at odds with Belloc's political one. Weakened by internal disagreement, the community became fragmented and finally dissolved. "James Lothian has presented in a coherent and even-handed way a vivid picture of the most important English Catholic thinkers of the twentieth century. He also deals perceptively with their excesses and defects. Hilaire Belloc is the dominant and shaping figure in this study but others play major roles, such as G. K. Chesterton, Eric Gill, and Evelyn Waugh. These intriguing figures raise questions about modern capitalism, add considerably to our understanding of modern Britain, and bring to mind as well queries about our present economic discontents."--Peter Stansky, Stanford University "This wide-ranging study of the flourishing English Catholic community in the first part of the twentieth century is an impressive and substantial contribution to scholarship. Lothian writes with clarity and vigor."--Ian Ker, University of Oxford "An astounding number of English intellectuals embraced Catholicism in the first half of the twentieth century. But they did not all share the same understanding of politics or the social order. Lothian's perceptive analysis of the important groups of thinkers and the trends within their thought sheds much light on their quarrels as well as their common sympathies, with special emphasis on the thought of Belloc, Chesterton, and Dawson. By providing such a careful account of the historical situation, it becomes far more clear why the giants of that generation took the stands they did on the important questions of the day."--Fr. Joseph Koterski, S.J., Fordham University "Lothian claims that Chesterton and especially Belloc created the underpinnings of a community of thinkers and writers that shaped the Catholic cultural environment of England in the years after the Great War. Their influence, however, was not only confined to Catholicism, as Lothian shows how this religious cohort also had an impact on the broader national community. This book fills a significant gap in the history of English Catholicism."--Jay P. Corrin, Boston University

Between Cross And Class

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Author: Lex Heerma van Voss
Publisher: Peter Lang Pub Incorporated
ISBN:
Size: 41.55 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
Category : History
Languages : en
Pages : 399
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In the late nineteenth century in a number of continental European countries Christian associations of workers arose: Christian trade unions, workers' cooperatives, political leagues, workers' youth movements and cultural associations, sometimes separately for men and women. In some countries they formed a unified Christian labour movement, which sometimes also belonged to a broader Christian subculture or pillar, encompassing all social classes. In traditional labour history Christian workers' organizations were solely represented as dividing the working class and weakening the class struggle. However, from the 1980s onwards a considerable amount of studies have been devoted to Christian workers' organizations that adopted a more nuanced approach. This book takes stock of this new historiography. To broaden the analysis, each contribution compares the development in at least two countries, thus generating new comparative insights. This volume assesses the development of Christian workers' organizations in Europe from a broad historical and comparative perspective. The contributions focus on the collective identity of the Christian workers' organization, their denominational and working-class allegiances and how these are expressed in ideology, organization and practice. Among the themes discussed are relations with churches and Christian Democracy, secularization, the development of the Welfare State, industrial relations and the contribution to working-class culture. This volume is the result of a joint intellectual enterprise of the International Institute of Social History (IISG) in Amsterdam (Netherlands) and a group of scholars linked to the KADOC--Documentation and ResearchCentre for Religion, Culture and Society of the KU Leuven (Catholic University Leuven-Belgium).

Catholic Theology In The University

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Author: Virginia M. Shaddy
Publisher:
ISBN:
Size: 23.34 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
Category : Religion
Languages : en
Pages : 122
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This volume contains essays on Catholic theology in the university.

Irish Catholicism Since 1950

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Author: Louise Fuller
Publisher: Gill
ISBN:
Size: 27.81 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
Category : Ireland
Languages : en
Pages : 380
View: 669


Louise Fuller sets the Church's role in its historical perspective before considering the triumphant institution of the 1950s. It was a Church of piety and ritual: mass attendance, church building, processions, pilgrimages, the erection of crosses, statues and grottos, the widespread dissemination of devotional literature and the cult of indulgences were its distinguishing characteristics. The rising prosperity of the '60s, plus the effects of the Vatican Council, began the liberalisation of Irish society. The bishops reacted defensively. Their conservatism stimulated the emergence of a Catholic intelligentsia, propagating more liberal attitudes and championing the new theology. The '70s and '80s saw a Church more open to liberation theology, to ecumenism and to issues of justice and peace generally, albeit change was gradual and piecemeal. The real revolution did not come until the 1990s, when a succession of clerical sexual scandals fatally subverted the unique moral authority of the Church which had been its greatest strength.

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